Category Archives: bots

Diversity in the Robot Reporter Newsroom

bots

The Associated Press recently announced a big new hire: A robot reporter from Automated Insights (AI) would be employed to write up to 4,400 earnings report stories per quarter. Last year, that same automated writing software produced over 300 million stories — that’s some serious scale from a single algorithmic entity.

So what happens to media diversity in the face of massive automated content production platforms like the one Automated Insights created? Despite the fact that we’ve done pretty abysmally at incorporating a balance of minority and gender perspectives in the news media, I think we’d all like to believe that by including diverse perspectives in the reporting and editing of news we fly closer to the truth. A silver lining to the newspaper industry crash has been a profusion of smaller, more nimble media outlets, allowing for far more variability and diversity in the ideas that we’re exposed to.

Of course software has biases and although the basic anatomy of robot journalists is comparable, there are variations within and amongst different systems such as the style and tone that’s produced as well as the editorial criteria that are coded into the systems. Algorithms are the product of a range of human choices including various criteria, parameters, or training data that can also pass along inherited, systematic biases. So while a robot reporter offers the promise of scale (and of reducing costs), we need to consider an over-reliance on any one single automated system. For the sake of media diversity the one bot needs to fork itself and become 100,000.

We saw this in microcosm unfold over the last week. The @wikiparliament bot was launched in the UK to monitor edits to Wikipedia from IP addresses within parliament (a form of transparency and accountability for who was editing what). Within days it had been mimed by the @congressedits bot which was set up to monitor the U.S. Congress. What was particularly interesting about @congressedits though is that it was open sourced by creator Ed Summers. And that allowed the bot to quickly spread and be adapted for different jurisdictions like Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Chile, Germany, and even Russia.

Tailoring a bot for different countries is just one (relatively simple) form of adaptation, but I think diversifying bots for different editorial perspectives could similarly benefit from a platform. I would propose that we need to build an open-source news bot architecture that different news and journalistic organizations could use as a scaffolding to encode their own editorial intents, newsworthiness criteria, parameters, data sets, ranking algorithms, cultures, and souls into. By creating a flexible platform as an underlying starting point, the automated media ecology could adapt and diversify faster and into new domains or applications.

Such a platform would also enable the expansion of bots oriented towards different journalistic tasks. A lot of the news and information bots you find on social media these days are parrots of various ilks: they aggregate content on a particular topical niche, like @BadBluePrep@FintechBot and @CelebNewsBot or for a geographical area like @North_GA, or they simply retweet other accounts based on some trigger words. Some of the more sophisticated bots do look at data feeds to generate novel insights, like @treasuryio or @mediagalleries, but there’s so much more that could be done if we had a flexible bot platform.

For instance we might consider building bots that act as information collectors and solicitors, moving away from pure content production to content acquisition. This isn’t so far off really. Researchers at IBM have been working on this for a couple years already and have already build a prototype system that “automatically identifies and ask[s] targeted strangers on Twitter for desired information.” The technology is oriented towards collecting accurate and up-to-date information from specific situations where crowd information may be valuable. It’s relatively easy to imagine an automated news bot being launched after a major news event to identify and solicit information, facts, or photos from people most likely nearby or involved in the event. In another related project the same group at IBM has been developing technology to identify people on Twitter that are more likely to propagate (Read: Retweet) information relating to public safety news alerts. Essentially they grease the gears of social dissemination by identifying just the right people for a given topic and at a particular time who are most likely to further share the information.

There are tons of applications for news bots just waiting for journalists to build them: factchecking, information gathering, network bridging, audience development etc. etc. Robot journalists don’t just have to be reporters. They can be editors, or even (hush) work on the business side.

What I think we don’t want to end up with is the Facebook or Google of robot reporting: “one algorithm to rule them all”. It’s great that the Associated Press is exploring the use of these technologies to scale up their content creation, but down the line when the use of writing algorithms extends far beyond earnings reports, utilizing only one platform may ultimately lead to homogenization and frustrate attempts to build a diverse media sphere. Instead the world that we need to actively create is one where there are thousands of artisanal news bots serving communities and variegated audiences, each crafted to fit a particular context and perhaps with a unique editorial intent. Having an open source platform would help enable that, and offer possibilities to plug in and explore a host of new applications for bots as well.

The Anatomy of a Robot Journalist

Note: A version of the following also appears on the Tow Center blog.

Given that an entire afternoon was dedicated to a “Robot Journalism Bootcamp” at the Global Editors Network Summit this week, it’s probably safe to say that automated journalism has finally gone mainstream — hey it’s only taken close to 40 years since the first story writing algorithm was created at Yale. But there are still lots of ethical questions and debates that we need to sort out, from source transparency to corrections policies for bots. Part of that hinges on exactly how these auto-writing algorithms work: What are their limitations and how might we design them to be more value-sensitive to journalism?

Despite the proprietary nature of most robot journalists, the great thing about patents is that they’re public. And patents have been granted to several major players in the robo-journalism space already, including Narrative Science, Automated Insights, and Yseop, making their algorithms just a little bit less opaque in terms of how they operate. More patents are in the pipeline from both heavy weights like CBS Interactive, and start-ups like Fantasy Journalist. So how does a robo-writer from Narrative Science really work?

Every robot journalist first needs to ingest a bunch of data. Data rich domains like weather were some of the first to have practical natural language generation systems. Now we’re seeing a lot of robot journalism applied to sports and finance — domains where the data can be standardized and made fairly clean. The development of sensor journalism may provide entirely new troves of data for producing automated stories. Key here is having clean and comprehensive data, so if you’re working in a domain that’s still stuck with PDFs or sparse access, the robots haven’t gotten there yet.

After data is read in by the algorithm the next step is to compute interesting or newsworthy features from the data. Basically the algorithm is trying to figure out the most critical aspects of an event, like a sports game. It has newsworthiness criteria built into its statistics. So for example, it looks for surprising statistical deviations like minimums, maximums, or outliers, big swings and changes in a value, violations of an expectation, a threshold being crossed, or a substantial change in a predictive model. “Any feature the value of which deviates significantly from prior expectation, whether the source of that expectation is due to a local computation or from an external source, is interesting by virtue of that deviation from expectation,” the Narrative Science patent reads. So for a baseball game the algorithm computes “win probability” after every play. If win probability has a big delta in-between two plays it probably means something important just happened and the algorithm puts that on a list of events that might be worthy of inclusion in the final story.

Once some interesting features have been identified, angles are then selected from a pre-authored library. Angles are explanatory or narrative structures that provide coherence to the overall story. Basically they are patterns of events, circumstances, entities, and their features. An angle for a sports story might be “back-and-forth horserace”, “heroic individual performance”, “strong team effort”, or “came out of a slump”. Certain angles are triggered according to the presence of certain derived features (from the previous step). Each angle is given an importance value from 1 to 10 which is then used to rank that angle against all of the other proposed angles.

Once the angles have been determined and ordered they are linked to specific story points, which connect back to individual pieces of data like names of players or specific numeric values like score. Story points can also be chosen and prioritized to account for personal interests such as home team players. These points can then be augmented with additional factual content drawn from internet databases such as where a player is from, or a quote or picture of them.

The last step the robot journalist takes is natural language generation, which for the Narrative Science system is done by recursively traversing all of the angle and story point representations and using phrasal generation routines to generate and splice together the actual English text. This is probably by far the most straightforward aspect of the entire pipeline — it’s pretty much just fancy templates.

So, there you have it, the pipeline for a robot journalist: (1) ingest data, (2) compute newsworthy aspects of the data, (3) identify relevant angles and prioritize them, (4) link angles to story points, and (5) generate the output text.

Obviously there can be variations to this basic pipeline as well. Automated insights for example uses randomization to provide variability in output stories and also incorporates a more sophisticated use of narrative tones that can be used to generate text. Based on a desired tone, different text might be generated to adhere to an apathetic, confident, pessimistic, or enthusiastic tone. YSeop on the other hand uses techniques for augmenting templates with metadata so that they’re more flexible. This allows templates to for instance conjugate verbs depending on the data being used. A post generation analyzer (you might call it a robot editor) from YSeop further improves the style of a written text by looking for repeated words and substituting synonyms or alternate words.

From my reading, I’d have to say that the Narrative Science patent seems to be the most informed by journalism. It stresses the notion of newsworthiness and editorial in crafting a narrative. But that’s not to say that the stylistic innovations from Automated Insights, and template flexibility of YSeop aren’t important. What still seems to be lacking though is a broader sense of newsworthiness besides “deviance” in these algorithms. Harcup and O’Neill identified 10 modern newsworthiness values, each of which we might make an attempt at mimicking in code: reference to the power elite, reference to celebrities, entertainment, surprise, bad news, good news, magnitude (i.e. significance to a large number of people), cultural relevance to audience, follow-up, and newspaper agenda. How might robot journalists evolve when they have a fuller palette of editorial intents available to them?