Tag Archives: credibility

Tweaking Your Credibility on Twitter

You want to be credible on social media, right? Well, a paper to be published at the Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) in early 2012 from researchers at Microsoft and Carnegie Mellon suggests at least a few actionable methods to help you do so. The basic motivation for the research is that when people see your tweet via a search (rather than following you) they have less cues to assess credibility. With a better understanding of what factors influence tweet credibility, new search interfaces can be designed to highlight the most relevant credibility cues (now you see why Microsoft is interested).

First off, five people were interviewed by the researchers to collect a range of issues that might be relevant to credibility perception. They came up with a list of 26 possible credibility cues and then ran a survey with 256 respondents in which they asked how much each feature impacted credibility perception. You can see the paper for the full results, but, for instance, things like keeping your tweets on a similar topic, using a personal photo, having a username related to the topic, having a location near a topic, having a bio that suggests relavent topical expertise, and frequent tweeting were all perceived by participants to positively impact credibility to some extent. Things like using non-standard grammar and punctuation, using the default user image were seen to detract from credibility.

Based on their first survey, the researchers then focused on three specific credibility cues for a follow-on study: (1) topic of tweets (politics, science, or entertainment), (2) user name style (first_last, internet – “tenacious27”, and topical – “AllPolitics”), and finally (3) user image (male / female photo, topical icon, generic icon, and default). For the study, each participant (there were 266) saw some combination of the above cues for a tweet, and rated both tweet credibility and author credibility. Unsurprisingly tweets about the science topic were rated as more credible than those on politics or entertainment. The most surprising result to me was that topically relevant user names were more credible than traditional names (or internet style names, though that’s not surprising). In a final follow-up experiment the researchers found that the user image doesn’t impact credibility perceptions, except for when the image is the default image in which case it significantly (in the statistical sense) lowers perceptions of tweet credibility.

So here are the main actionable take-aways:

  • Don’t use non standard grammar and punctuation (no “lol speak”)
  • Don’t use the default image.
  • Tweet about topics like science, which seem to carry an aura of credibility.
  • Find a user name that is topically aligned with those you want to reach.
That last point of finding a topically aligned user name might be an excellent strategy for large news organizations to build a more credible presence across a range of topics. For instance, right now the NY Times has a mix of accounts that have topical user names, as well as reporters using their real names. In addition to each reporter having their own “real name” account, individual tweets of theirs that were topically relevant could be routed to the appropriate topically named account. So for instance, let’s say Andy Revkin tweets something about the environment. That tweet should also show up via the Environment account, since the tweet may be perceived as having higher credibility from a topically-related user name. For people who search and find that tweet, of course if they know who Andy Revkin is, then they’ll find his tweet quite credible since he’s known for having that topical expertise. But for someone else who doesn’t know who Andy Revkin is, the results of the above study suggest that that person would find the same content more credible coming from the topically related Environment account. Maybe the Times or others are already doing this. But if not, it seems like there’s an opportunity to systematically increase credibility by adopting such an approach.